Monday, September 04, 2006

editor's role

Sometimes I think the editor's role is to stop the author falling in love with his and her own words and encourage them to want the reader to fall in love with his or her words.

4 comments:

delwyne said...

Hi Andrew, have just checked out your blog for the first time. Congratulations on your honesty and bravery! I'm going to add it to my blog links as I think it is a great resource for new writers, particularly to get a feel for the industry and the reality of the risk of being a publisher. I am an author but I can appreciate where the risk lies in producing a book. I love your comment about trying to help authors not to love their own work too much and to keep in mind the readers' perspective. So true! Someone confided in me recently that she had written a book and asked me how to get it published. She said she didn't want one of those publishers who took years and would want to make lots of changes! She has a lot to learn, of course. I took a deep breath and filled her in...

About Queenie, I think the baby boomers have intensely fond memories of her and while not a baby boomer, I knew of Queenie. I was surprised at how the media took hold of the story. Perhaps it has something to do with the warmth of the memories; a time when you could go to the zoo and ride an elephant. Imagine that! Knowing it is a true story will (and obviously has) capture the imagination of kids.

As you said in an earlier blog it doesn't do to shy away from death. My friend lost her mum two weeks ago - a grandmother, very unexpected. And Steve Irwin dying. My goodness, the collective grief and great loss children around Australia and even the world are feeling needs to be dealt with in some way. Sensitively handled stories can be a good way to help parents help their kids through times of grief. Cheers, delwyne

delwyne said...

Hi Andrew, I like your blog. I think it is good for authors to consider things from the publishers perspective as the risk is mostly on the publishers shoulders. It is a shame that US and THEM barriers get in the way at times.

Regarding the earlier blogs on Queenie I have been surprised at the publicity the book has garnered. I think baby boomers have warm memories of Queenie. On the children's part, I think their imagination will be (and clearly has been) captured by a story about an elephant that you could ride at the zoo. That this is a true story is even more magical!

I agree that death is too shied away from in our culture (a comment from an earlier blog). Steve Irwin's passing this week has brought death to the fore for most Australians. Children in Australia, indeed around the world, are mourning him. Books can help parents to help their kids to do this. Cheers, delwyne

delwyne said...

Hi Andrew - how embarassing, two blogs and my pic! I thought I deleted the first blog and with a sigh, re-wrote. Does anyone know how I can write a blog without my pic accompanying me? Too daggy!

Andrew's black dog blog said...

thanks for your supportive comments.